Christopher H Ko

Artwork

Heart
Heart
2013. Antique Glass, Gold Leaf, Rock Salt, 3d Pinted Ceramic
Game Night
Game Night
2016. 88 glass cubes and 2 spheres 400 x 480 x 320 mm
Workbook [detail]
Workbook [detail]
2017. Velobound book 8.5 x 11 x 1-7/8 inches 134 pages
Institution [detail]
Institution [detail]
2016. Colored glass, copper foil, palladium leaf

Artistic Statement

Christopher K. Ho dissects and examines the hidden social forces that implicate contemporary art within capitalist society, moving beyond institutional critique and calling artists, curators, and scholars to action.

Ho carefully analyzes the trends and movements within art and connects them to politics, social history, economics, and popular culture through site-specific artworks, new media, and writing that reveal the complacency perpetuated by the art world. Instead, he proposes a focus on contemporaneity in art, where it takes an active stance on the realities and issues of the present time. Ho’s focus on process, transparency, and care counters reactionary politically oriented art and offers avenues for understanding the interconnectedness of power, individualism, and privilege.

Bio - CV

Christopher K. Ho (Hong Kong, 1974) is an artist and curator who lives and works in New York City. He graduated from Cornell University in 1997 with a B.F.A. and Columbia University in 2003 with an M.Phil.

Ho is known for an eclectic practice that encompasses conceptual painting, sculpture, photography, and writing. He employs these diverse formats to explore what he describes as the “often invisible social forces implicating contemporary art,” referencing not only other artists but also sociological, economical, and historical threads. Ho’s 2013 solo show and series Demoiselles d’Avignon, for example, at Y Gallery in New York, was inspired in part by Picasso’s own series of the same name, and “refracted Western abstraction through the eyes of a future class of refined Chinese princelings.” 2013’s Privileged White People, meanwhile, focused on the sensibility of artists who grew up during the affluence of the Clinton presidency. And 2008’s Happy Birthday, hosted by New York’s Winkleman Gallery (and Ho’s first solo show), included a life-sized nude replica of gallerist Ed Winkleman in an otherwise empty, grey-painted space.  His works are site-oriented and collaboratively-produced.

The artist’s work was included in the Incheon Biennale (2009); the Chinese Biennale in Beijing (2008); the Busan Biennale (2008); as well as in group shows at Storm King Art Center (2013) and the Cranbrook Art Museum (2011). His work has been exhibited at MassMoCa, Dallas Contemporary, Jamaica Center for the Arts, Queens Museum of Art and Socrates Sculpture Park. Recent solo exhibitions include RENT at Fjord in Philadelphia, Demoiselles d’Avignon at Y Gallery in New York City and Privileged White People at Forever & Today in New York City. In addition to teaching at RISD, Ho has taught at Cranbrook Academy of Art, where he was a critical studies teaching fellow from 2010–11.